Disaster Recovery Reform Act of 2018 Overview

Disaster Recovery Reform Act of 2018

On Oct. 5, 2018, President Trump signed the Disaster Recovery Reform Act (DRRA) of 2018 into law as part of the Federal Aviation Administration Reauthorization Act of 2018. These reforms acknowledge the shared responsibility for disaster response and recovery, aim to reduce the complexity of FEMA, and build the nation’s capacity for the next catastrophic event.

The law contains approximately 50 provisions that require FEMA policy or regulation changes for full implementation, as they amend the Robert T. Stafford Disaster Relief and Emergency Assistance Act.

More Information, Link to https://www.fema.gov/disaster-recovery-reform-act-2018 and find a summary of each section of the act, as well as the status on FEMA’s implementation.  The law requires FEMA policy or regulation changes for full implementation.  To view a summary of all the changes in DRRA, click HERE.


FEMA Releases Inaugural DRRA Implementation Report – 2019

October 30, 2019

FEMA released the first annual report on Agency implementation of the Disaster Recovery Reform Act of 2018 (DRRA).  This report provides an overview of the DRRA, highlights how FEMA’s strategic goals align to the act, and describes FEMA implementation efforts and achievements since 2018.

FEMA has already implemented more than half of the provisions identified in the law.  As a direct result of this implementation, FEMA expanded support for mitigation, to include provision of $86 million in funding for wildfire mitigation projects to protect nearly 2,500 more properties.

Additionally, FEMA increased the amount of assistance available to individuals following a disaster, providing more than $61 million in additional assistance to over 11,000 individuals, and more than $12 million in additional disaster unemployment assistance to applicants in Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands.  FEMA has also published guidance on the prioritization of assistance during power outages, the identification of evacuation routes, and the coordination of emergency response plans for hazardous materials.

The DRRA contains 56 provisions that require policy or regulation changes that amend the Robert T. Stafford Disaster Relief and Emergency Assistance Act to strengthen national capabilities to prepare for, mitigate against, and recover from major disasters. These reforms acknowledge the shared responsibility for disaster response and recovery, aim to reduce the complexity of FEMA, and build the nation’s capacity for the next catastrophic event.

For more information on DRRA, visit the FEMA Website.


Building Resilient Infrastructure and Communities (BRIC)

Building Resilient Infrastructure and Communities (BRIC), focuses on reducing the nation’s risk by funding public infrastructure projects that increase a community’s resilience before a disaster affects an area.

As a federal disaster mitigation program, BRIC allows FEMA to invest grant monies in infrastructure projects before a disaster affects an area.  Examples of interest areas include infrastructure mitigation projects; hazard mitigation planning; building codes and enforcement; and risk informed funding.

Link to Hazard Mitigation Assistance Guidance | FEMA.gov


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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