Mitigation Resources

 

Click here for a list of Mitigation Resource Links

Kentucky Vulnerable to Multi-hazards

  • Dam Failure
  • Drought
  • Earthquake
  • Extreme Temperature
  • Flood
  • Hail Storm
  • Karst/Sinkhole
  • Mine/Land Subsidence
  • Landslide
  • Severe Storm
  • Severe Winter Storm
  • Tornado
  • Forest Fire

 

New USGS Tool Shows Historic & Simulated Future Water Conditions in the U.S.

January 12, 2017

The Hydrology Futures Portal, released by the U.S. Geological Survey, provides a user-friendly interface summarizing monthly historic (1952 through 2005) and simulated future conditions (2020 through 2099) for various meteorological and hydrological variables at locations across the conterminous United States.

The features on this new application include seven searchable meteorological and hydrological variables: actual evapotranspiration, atmospheric temperature, potential evapotranspiration and precipitation, runoff, snow water equivalent (the volume of water stored in the snowpack/depth of water if the snow melted) and streamflow.

 

USGS publishesIdentifying and preserving high-water mark data: techniques and methods 3-A24  

March 18, 2016

The report serves as a field guide for identifying high-water marks and presents guidance and proper techniques for preserving, evaluating, and recording the data collected for use in surface-water modelling, flood documentation and much more.

Flood Resilience Guide to protect utilities.  Introducing EPA’s tool, Flood Resilience: A Basic Guide for Water and Wastewater Utilities, which was designed for small and medium drinking water and utilities and includes interactive worksheets, instructional videos, and flood maps. With a user-friendly layout, embedded videos, and flood maps to guide you, EPA’s Flood Resilience Guide is your one-stop resource to protect your critical assets.

Planning for Drought 

The Planning for Drought Resilience Fact Sheet describes how mitigation planning is integrated with drought resilience, and how FEMA’s work in mitigation planning supports the 2016 Memorandum and Federal Action Plan on Building Capabilities for Long-Term Drought Resilience.

 

FHWA Climate Change Vulnerability and Risk Assessment

The Federal Highway Administration (FHWA’s) Climate Change and Extreme Weather Vulnerability Assessment Framework is a guide and collection of resources for use in analyzing the impacts of climate change and extreme weather on transportation infrastructure.  Its purpose is to identify key considerations, questions, and resources that can be used to design and implement a climate change vulnerability assessment.  The processes, lessons learned, and resources outlined in the framework are geared toward State departments of transportation (DOTs), metropolitan planning organizations (MPOs), and other agencies involved in planning, building, or maintaining the transportation system.  It includes suggestions and examples applicable to a wide range of applications, from small qualitative studies to large, detailed, data-intensive analyses.

Download the FHA Climate Change and Weather Vulnerability Assessment Framework.

 

Some Other Important Publications …

Protecting Building Utility Systems from Flood Damage, 2nd Edition – FEMA P-348.  February 2017. The FEMA Building Science Branch is pleased to announce the release of the second edition of Protecting Building Utilities from Flood Damage, FEMA P-348. The overall objective of this updated publication is to assist in the repair, reconstruction and new construction of buildings with building utility systems and equipment that are designed and built for maximum flood resiliency.

The updated publication illustrates design and construction of utility systems that comply with the National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP) requirements for new or Substantially Improved residential and non-residential structures in flood-prone areas. It is also useful when evaluating structures for utility system upgrades or replacement, guiding users to meet floodplain management regulations and building code requirements. Even if NFIP compliance is not required, many building owners may find that applying the mitigation measures described in this publication will not only reduce future flood damage, but also facilitate faster recovery after flooding.

Key document features include:

  • Updated materials to reflect the latest versions of the International Code Council® codes and building standards;
  • Improved photographs, schematics and graphics;
  • Expanded sections to address specific mitigation measures both residential and non-residential building utility systems and equipment; and
  • Tools to assist the building owner in determining the best mitigation option for a particular building type and condition.

To download a copy of FEMA P-348 go to https://www.fema.gov/media-library/assets/documents/3729.

Emergency Power Systems for Critical Facilities: A Best Practices Approach to Improving Reliability (FEMA P-1019) 
March 2015.  There is a significant likelihood that utility power will not be available for an extended period of time during severe natural hazard events. Thus, it is necessary for critical facilities to have reliable sources of sustained electrical power to achieve continued operation. This new publication provides guidance on the design and operation of emergency power systems in critical facilities so that they will be able to remain operational for extended periods, as needed.

This document examines the vulnerability of electrical power systems to natural hazards, describes what equipment in critical facilities should be supplied by emergency power sources, how long the emergency power may be needed, the specific equipment needs of different types of critical facilities, and how emergency power can be supplied. It provides guidance on how to assess the risks and vulnerabilities to the electrical power system, identifying performance goals for an emergency power system, and the importance of having realistic emergency management policies that address emergency power.  FEMA P-1019 is available in print and can also be downloaded for free at: https://www.fema.gov/media-library/assets/documents/101996.

Improving Outcomes and Increasing Benefits Associated with Wetland and Stream Restoration Projects.  September 2014.  The Environmental Law Institute and The Nature Conservancy released a new handbook to advance the use of a watershed approach in the selection, design, and siting of wetland and stream restoration and protection projects, including projects required as compensatory mitigation for permitted activities.  The joint report, Watershed Approach Handbook: Improving Outcomes and Increasing Benefits Associated with Wetland and Stream Restoration and Protection Projects demonstrates how using a watershed approach can help ensure that these projects also contribute to goals of improved water quality, increased flood mitigation,improved quality and quantity of habitat, and increases in other ecological services and benefits.

Planning and Building Livable, Safe & Sustainable Communities – Patchwork_Quilt_Approach 2012.  A white paper from the Natural Hazard Mitigation Association (NHMA).  Link here to the Planning and Building Livable, Safe & Sustainable Communities- Patchwork_Quilt_Approach 2012.

Reducing Flood Losses Through the International Codes®: Coordinating Building Codes and Floodplain Management Regulations (4th Edition)September 2014.  A joint effort by the International Code Council and FEMA, this edition is a significant change from earlier versions.  It has new content to describe the differences between NFIP regulations and I-Code requirements for buildings, identifies pertinent questions that should be answered in the context of each State’s or local community’s existing statutes and codes, and offers examples of Cover photo for the document: Reducing Flood Losses Through the International Codes: Coordinating Building Codes and Floodplain Management Regulations, 4th Edition (2014)how the I-Codes can be modified to incorporate even higher standards to increase resistance to flood damage.

Also new in this edition is an introduction and link to download three versions of a model floodplain management ordinance that satisfies NFIP requirements and coordinates with the flood provisions of the I-Codes.  Communities participating in the National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP) can rely on the 2009 and later editions of the International Codes® (I‑Codes) to form the basis of their floodplain management practices. The flood provisions in these editions meet or exceed the minimum NFIP requirements for buildings and structures in Special Flood Hazard Areas and contain a number of higher standards.  Reducing Flood Losses Through the International Codes®(4th Edition)is available at http://www.fema.gov/media-library/assets/documents/96634.  The model ordinance can be downloaded at: http://www.fema.gov/media-library/assets/documents/96224.

Quick Reference Guide: Comparison of Select NFIP & Building Code Requirements for Special Flood Hazard Areas  (March 2012) The Quick Reference Guide  is an 8-page guide that highlights the similarities and differences between the National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP) minimum requirements and the requirements of the International Code Series (I-Codes) and ASCE 24, Flood Resistant Design and Construction, a standard referenced by the I-Codes. Among the features contrasted are foundation types, lowest floor elevations,enclosures below elevated buildings, and utilities requirements within the NFIP and I-Codes for most residential and commercial buildings.

Engineering Principles and Practices for Retrofitting Flood-Prone Residential Structures. The third edition of Engineering Principles and Practices for Retrofitting Flood-Prone Residential Structures (FEMA P 259)  is now available from the FEMA Publications Warehouse! To read more about the document and for other information, see the article here: [Full Article].

 

EHP Publications  

Environmental and Historic Preservation (EHP) At-A-Glance:   http://www.fema.gov/library/viewRecord.do?id=5904  This document provides provides information on how to incorporate environmental and historic preservation considerations into your Hazard Mitigation Assistance (HMA) grant application and project.

 

Benefit/Cost Publication

FEMA Benefit Cost Toolkit Version 5.3  January 10, 2017  The Benefit Cost Tool Version 5.3 is used to perform benefit cost analysis for applications submitted under FEMA’s Hazard Mitigation Assistance Grant Programs.  To use this tool, you must link to FEMA’s Benefit Cost Toolkit Version 5.3 to download the compressed file , extract and save the file in one folder on your computer. While the program is installing, additional file sets will be downloaded from the internet. Make sure to maintain access to the internet until the program is fully installed. If you have any questions about the new BCA software program, please contact the BC Helpline at bchelpline@dhs.gov or at 1-855-540-6744. 

 

USGS Fact Sheet  – USGS Emergency Response Resources

A new USGS Emergency Response Resources Fact Sheet is available.   This is a quick reference guide to USGS response resources including:

  • real-time information for flooding, earthquakes, landslides, and volcanoes
  • flood and hurricane databases
  • geospatial data and services supporting emergency response
  • USGS offices supporting emergency response

Link to the fact sheet USGS Emergency Response Resources.

 

FEMA Mitigation Planning Publications

  • Mitigation Ideas:  Mitigation Ideas provides a range of potential mitigation actions for reducing risk to natural hazards and disasters. Ideas for mitigation actions are presented for the following natural hazards: drought, earthquake, erosion, extreme temperatures, flood, hail, landslide, lightning, sea level rise, severe wind, severe winter weather, storm surge, subsidence, tornado, tsunami, and wildfire.
  • Frameworks: How We Work Together to Build, Sustain, and Deliver Capabilities to Ensure a Secure and Resilient Nation:  The Federal Government and its partners released three of five National Planning Frameworks. These National Planning Frameworks, document the roles and responsibilities of the whole community in all facets of national preparedness. The benefit of this unified effort is  a more informed, shared understanding of risks, needs, and capabilities across the whole community; and, in the end, a more secure and resilient nation.  The whole community—individuals and families, including those with access and functional needs; businesses and nonprofits; schools; media; and all levels of government—is encouraged to read and use each Framework.  Read more on KAMM’s Mitigation Resource page.
  • National Planning Frameworks: How We Work Together to Build, Sustain, and Deliver Capabilities to Ensure a Secure and Resilient Nation  The Federal Government and its partners today released three of five National Planning Frameworks. These National Planning Frameworks, document the roles and responsibilities of the whole community in all facets of national preparedness. The benefit of this unified effort is  a more informed, shared understanding of risks, needs, and capabilities across the whole community; and, in the end, a more secure and resilient nation.  The Frameworks outline how the whole community can take steps to collectively achieve the National Preparedness Goal.  The whole community—individuals and families, including those with access and functional needs; businesses and nonprofits; schools; media; and all levels of government—is encouraged to read and use each Framework.The three Frameworks released today are:

The National Prevention Framework. Focuses on avoiding, preventing, or stopping a threatened or actual act of terrorism. While other mission areas focus on all hazards, including natural disasters, Prevention focuses solely on terrorism. Specifically on imminent acts of terrorism on U.S. soil.

The National Mitigation Framework. Refers to reducing the loss of life and property by lessening the effects of disasters. This means, for example, taking actions now that would reduce property damage when a hurricane strikes. Mitigation also involves actions that improve our ability to bounce back after disasters. Resilience is a key focus.

The National Response Framework. Covers the capabilities necessary to save lives, protect property and the environment, and meet basic human needs after an incident has occurred. The National Response Framework was updated from the familiar 2008 version.

The National Planning Frameworks are part of the National Preparedness System, which outlines the tools and processes to help us achieve national preparedness.  To download the Frameworks and view the complementary tutorial, visit: www.fema.gov/national-planning-frameworks.

 

Private Sector More Tools and Information

FEMA.gov includes a dedicated portal where the private sector can find resources and information covering the whole emergency management cycle. This portal also includes social media applications, such as Twitter and a widget, information on training, grants, other federal resources, and weekly tips: www.fema.gov/privatesector.

 

 

 

 

 

 

KAMM mailing address: KAMM, PO Box 1016, Frankfort, KY 40602-1016. Have questions, contact us at kentuckymitigation@gmail.com.  Don’t forget to join the KAMM group on LinkedIn .