CRS Credit for Stormwater Management Guide

Stormwater Overview

One of the biggest problems of floodplain management in urbanizing areas is the increase in peak flow and total volume of runoff caused by development within a watershed.  As forests, fields, and farms are covered by impermeable surfaces like streets, rooftops, and parking lots, more rain runs off at a faster rate.  When an area is urbanized, the rate of runoff can increase five-fold or more if proper mitigation is not provided.

This problem is compounded by changes in the surface drainage system.  Stormwater runoff travels faster on streets and in storm drains than it does across forests or fields, or in natural channels.  As a result, flooding is more frequent and more severe after development, channels begin to erode, water quality is diminished, and riparian habitat is lost.

Efforts to reduce the impact of increased runoff resulting from new development or increases in impervious surface in redeveloping a site are known as “stormwater management”.  Stormwater management also encompasses many aspects of water quality, and includes efforts to reduce erosion and the entry of sediment and pollutants into receiving streams.

Among the objectives of the CRS are flood damage reduction and the protection of natural processes such as water quality and habitat for endangered species.  These objectives are addressed by the elements in this CRS activity. 

 


CRS Credit for Stormwater Management Guide

CRS Credit for Stormwater Management is a full 27-page guide, including examples, to help communities tailor their stormwater management and watershed management programs in ways that reduce flood losses, protect natural processes, and earn CRS credit. 

This 2020 edition provides background on the creditable management techniques, discusses the legal aspects of such management, and describes various ways to document the creditable activities. 

Link to the CRS Credit for Stormwater Management.

 

This 2020 edition provides background on the creditable management techniques, discusses the legal aspects of such management, and describes various ways to document the creditable activities.

 

Link to the CRS Credit for Stormwater Management