KAMM Updates

Kentucky Watches, Warnings or Advisories  – Weather Alerts Follow the alerts, link here.

 

KAMM’s 15th Anniversary!  

2019 KAMM Conference

KAMM XV: Celebrate the Past, Inspire the Future

Lake Barkley State Resort Park

September 17-19, 2019

September 16, 2019 – Pre-conference Workshop and Activities

Conference Recap & Presentations: Link here.  

Conference Photos: Link here

Thanks for Attending the Conference!  

 
 

Announcing Grant Funding Available for Water Pollution Control Projects

October 18, 2019

Applications are being accepted to fund nonpoint source pollution control projects, the Kentucky Energy and Environment Cabinet announced.  Projects that help clean up polluted streams, rivers, lakes, and groundwater and for projects that protect water resources are eligible for funding through Section 319(h) of the Clean Water Act.

Funds can be used for watershed restoration projects, watershed plan development, and other projects that reduce and prevent runoff pollution.  These funds can be used to pay for up to 60-percent of the cost of each project, with a required 40-percent non-federal match.

Nonpoint source pollution, also known as runoff pollution, is the primary contributor to water pollution in Kentucky.  The Division will give priority to projects involving watershed plan development and implementation for impaired waters, source water protection areas, and the protection of special-use waters (e.g., cold water aquatic habitat, exceptional waters, state wild rivers and federal wild and scenic rivers) with identified threats.

Applications must be submitted no later than December 3, 2019.  

To find stream designations in your area, please visit the Cabinet’s water health portal.  To determine if your organization is eligible and to obtain the project proposal form and other supporting documents, please visit the grant program page.

Grant Guidelines

  1. Read the Grant Guidance Document and Application instructions.
  2. Contact an NPS staff member (your Basin Coordinator) to discuss your potential project.
  3. Submit Project Proposal Form by December 3, 2019.
  4. An NPS staff member will contact you to discuss your proposal.
  5. Upon invitation develop an application.
  6. Submit application.  Application must be postmarked by midnight February 7, 2020.
  7. Contract written and executed.
  8. Project begins.

For more information, contact Dale Booth at 502-782-6895 or dale.booth@ky.gov.

 

 


2019 Publications, Program Updates and Releases

 

FEMA Releases Inaugural DRRA Implementation Report

October 30, 2019

FEMA released the first annual report on Agency implementation of the Disaster Recovery Reform Act of 2018 (DRRA).  This report provides an overview of the DRRA, highlights how FEMA’s strategic goals align to the act, and describes FEMA implementation efforts and achievements since 2018.

FEMA has already implemented more than half of the provisions identified in the law.  As a direct result of this implementation, FEMA expanded support for mitigation, to include provision of $86 million in funding for wildfire mitigation projects to protect nearly 2,500 more properties.

Additionally, FEMA increased the amount of assistance available to individuals following a disaster, providing more than $61 million in additional assistance to over 11,000 individuals, and more than $12 million in additional disaster unemployment assistance to applicants in Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands.  FEMA has also published guidance on the prioritization of assistance during power outages, the identification of evacuation routes, and the coordination of emergency response plans for hazardous materials.

The DRRA contains 56 provisions that require policy or regulation changes that amend the Robert T. Stafford Disaster Relief and Emergency Assistance Act to strengthen national capabilities to prepare for, mitigate against, and recover from major disasters. These reforms acknowledge the shared responsibility for disaster response and recovery, aim to reduce the complexity of FEMA, and build the nation’s capacity for the next catastrophic event.

For more information on DRRA, visit the FEMA Website.

 


FEMA Publishes New Public Assistance Policy

November 6, 2019

On Nov. 6, FEMA published “Consensus-Based Codes, Specifications and Standards for Public Assistance.” The policy is meant to increase the resiliency of communities post disaster and support the efficient use of federal funds from FEMA’s Public Assistance program, while reducing future vulnerabilities.

Disasters declared on or after the date of this interim policy must apply the relevant consensus-based codes, specifications and standards.  The permanent work projects include buildings, electric power, roads, bridges, potable water and wastewater.  Applicants who fall into any of the following categories have 60 days following date of policy publication to opt-in to the guidelines of this interim policy:

  • Incidents declared between Aug. 1, 2017, and the date of policy publication;
  • Projects for incidents declared before Aug. 1, 2017, but without an obligation based on a finalized cost estimate as of the date of policy publication; or
  • Projects associated with a cost estimate on appeal as of the date of policy publication.

Applicants wishing to opt-in must make their determination no later than Jan. 5, 2020.  The applicants will need to contact their FEMA Regional Recovery Office and complete the opt-in notification form included in Appendix B of the policy.

 


Reducing Flood Losses Through the International Codes: Coordinating Building Codes and Floodplain Management Regulations, 5th Edition

October 18, 2019

Developed by the International Code Council and FEMA, this guide helps state and local officials integrate the International Codes® (I-Codes®) into their current floodplain management regulatory processes related to structures, buildings, and other development to satisfy the requirements to participate in the NFIP.  FEMA considers the latest editions of the I-Codes to be the minimum standards for hazard resistance, including flood hazards, high winds, and earthquake hazards.

  • Chapter 2 describes three approaches for coordinating the I-Codes and local floodplain management regulations and identifies several advantages and considerations when relying on the flood provisions of the codes.
  • Chapter 3 explains several differences between the NFIP regulations and the I-Code requirements related to specific terminology and provisions. Many requirements in the codes exceed NFIP minimum requirements, and some provisions are more specific than the NFIP, especially in the International Building Code®, which references ASCE 24, Flood Resistant Design and Construction.
  • Chapter 4 contains questions that states and communities should answer to know whether and how to modify existing floodplain management regulations to coordinate with building codes.
  • Chapter 5 describes modifications that can be adopted to incorporate higher standards in State and local building codes that are based on the I-Codes to further increase building and community resilience to flood damage.
  • Chapter 6 introduces the model code-coordinated ordinances prepared by FEMA. The model ordinances are available at: http://www.fema.gov/media-library/assets/documents/96224.
  • Appendix A lists cited references and other resources that are useful for understanding and interpreting the requirements of the NFIP.
  • Appendix B provides sample checklists for a plan review and inspection.

Link to Reducing Flood Losses through the International Codes

 


DRRA Section 1231 Fact Sheet: Acquisition of Property for Open Space and Policy Clarification

October 2019

Through its Hazard Mitigation Assistance (HMA) grant programs, FEMA funds the voluntary acquisition of hazard-prone properties from private owners.  Property acquisition is not new for FEMA; however, DRRA Section 1231 contains new requirements for the project notification process and emphasizes a community’s responsibilities regarding acquired land.

The newly released DRRA Section 1231 Fact Sheet outlines these new requirements for state, tribal, territorial and local governments and supplements existing FEMA guidance on property acquisition projects per the DRRA.

FEMA also released a policy clarification on the Eligibility of Hazard Mitigation Assistance Applications with Pre-Award Demolitions.  This policy clarifies that when private individuals have demolished damaged structures using private funds or other non-federal funds prior to application for HMA funding, the properties will now be eligible for inclusion in HMA project applications if the demolition is not connected to the project.  The demolition costs cannot be included in the project application. 

 


October 2019 NFIP Program Changes

New four-minute Online Video!
The National Flood Insurance Program continues to undergo change. 
Some of the change is aimed at providing a better customer experience for policyholders while other changes continue the implementation of the Biggert-Waters Flood Insurance Reform Act and the Homeowner Flood Insurance Affordability Act.  This new short video explains the key elements of changes to the NFIP that are effective October 1, 2019.

What You Will Learn:  The October Program Changes video details three NFIP program changes related to:

  • National Producer Numbers
  • Specific Rating Guidelines
  • The Community Rating System Eligible Communities List

Flood Insurance Rates Increase

October 2019

On Oct. 1, FEMA announced key changes for the National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP), to begin on April 1, 2020.  These changes include updated increases to conform to the premium rate caps established by the Biggert-Waters Flood Insurance Reform Act of 2012 (BW-12) and the Homeowner Flood Insurance Affordability Act of 2014 (HFIAA).   

Beginning on April 1, 2020, renewal premiums will increase an average of 11.3 percent.  These amounts do not include the HFIAA Surcharge, or the Federal Policy Fee (FPF).  Nearly 80 percent of policyholders already pay a full-risk rate and will therefore not experience this rate increase.  The Severe Repetitive Loss Premium is increasing to 10 percent for all policies covering properties with that designation.

In addition, it was also announced that annual premium increases of 14.9 percent for preferred risk policies and 14.8 percent for newly mapped procedure policies will be effective on Jan. 1, 2021.

In addition to the rate increases, revisions to the NFIP Flood Insurance Manual, which is updated twice a year, took effect Oct. 1, 2019.  FEMA incorporated the NFIP program changes published in April 2019 into this edition.  The updated edition of the “Flood Insurance Manual” does not change flood insurance coverage or supersede the terms and conditions of the standard flood insurance policy.  The changes in effect include:

  • An updated list of Community Rating System eligible communities (Table 3).
  • An updated list of resources and contact information for technical assistance.
  • Several updates or changes to various Letters of Map Revision.

The two bulletins announcing these October changes are available online.  Visit FEMA.gov to review the NFIP Flood Insurance Manual.

 


New CDBG-DR Policy Guide for Grantees

October 2019

The Community Development Block Grant Disaster Recovery (CDBG-DR) Policy Guide reflects guidance provided in CDBG-DR Federal Register Notices and policy documents since 2016. It provides grantees, subrecipients, and program partners with central and easy access to recent HUD policy guidance indexed based on common disaster recovery topics:

  • General Program Requirements
  • Housing Activities
  • Voluntary Purchases of Real Property (Buyouts and Acquisitions)
  • Economic Development/Revitalization
  • Public Facilities and Public Improvements
  • Other Program Requirements

This guide will assist grantees to develop and administer CDBG-DR programs in compliance with HUD rules and cross-cutting federal regulations.

Link to View the CDBG-DR Policy Guide for Grantees.

 


Guidelines for Wind Vulnerability Assessments of Existing Critical Facilities

October 2019

FEMA’s Building Science Branch Releases Guidelines for Wind Vulnerability Assessments of Existing Critical Facilities, a manual for design professionals.

Hurricanes Irma and Maria in Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands, as well as other recent storms including Hurricane Michael in Florida, resulted in extensive wind damage to critical facilities.  FEMA Building Science, Region II, and DR-4339, in coordination with partners and subject matter experts, has developed FEMA P-2062: Guidelines for Wind Vulnerability Assessments of Existing Critical Facilities. The manual incorporates observations and lessons learned from recent and past hurricanes, current building code requirements, and other historic high wind events.

The purpose of this manual is to provide design professionals with guidelines for assessing the vulnerability of critical facilities to wind pressure, wind-borne debris, and wind-driven rain.  The guidelines apply to critical facilities both within and outside hurricane-prone regions as well as to critical facilities in tornado-prone regions.  

The results of an assessment can be used by building owners; design professionals; entities that award repair, reconstruction, or mitigation grants; as well as state, local, tribal, and territorial government agencies developing mitigation plans.

 


New Three-Dimensional Roof Snowdrifts Design Guide

October 2019

Following a series of heavy snow and wind events in February of 2015, a FEMA team assessed four partial school building collapses in the Greater Boston area.  In all four cases, the partial collapses were due to roof snowdrift loading.

When following the current ASCE 7 minimum load requirements for three-dimensional snow drifts, the FEMA team observed and documented that in two cases 3-D drifts cannot be determined.  In this new design guide, FEMA provides guidance for determining 3-D roof snowdrift loads through design examples.   The procedures identified are consistent with the intersecting drift provisions expected in the 2022 edition of ASCE 7.  In the interim until the published revisions, these provisions are intended to serve as best practice guidance for design professionals.   

The Three-Dimensional Roof Snowdrifts Design Guide is available here.

 


FEMA Announces National Mitigation Investment Strategy

August 13, 2019

FEMA, in close coordination with experts across governmental agencies, academia and non-governmental organizations, released the National Mitigation Investment Strategy.  The strategy is intended to improve the coordination and effectiveness of mitigation investments, defined as risk management actions taken to avoid, reduce or transfer risks from natural hazards.  The Investment Strategy’s overarching goal is to improve the coordination and effectiveness of “mitigation investments,” defined as risk management actions taken to avoid, reduce, or transfer risks from natural hazards, including severe weather.

This document provides a national, whole-community approach to investments in mitigation activities and risk management across federal, state, local, and tribal and territorial governments, as well as the private and non-profit sectors.  Recommendations proposed in the strategy will reduce loss of life and injures, damage to property, and negative impacts to the economy and the environment, and lead the whole community in building a more resilient future.

Below are recent examples of EPA’s continued dedication and investment in mitigation strategies across the country.

  • Regional Resilience Technical Assistance – After helping three California regions take large-scale action for disaster resilience, EPA and FEMA partnered with the Metropolitan Transportation Commission/Association of Bay Area Governments to create a toolkit that helps regions plan for disasters by working across multiple jurisdictions and with non-governmental partners.  The Regional Resilience Toolkit provides a step-by-step process to help decision makers engage with partners and stakeholders, conduct vulnerability assessments, identify and prioritize strategies, fund projects, and evaluate results. 
  • Integrating Water Quality and Nature-Based Approaches into Hazard Mitigation Plans – EPA’s Office of Water and Office of Community Revitalization are partnering with FEMA to help states and communities integrate hazard mitigation plans and water quality plans.  Project locations include: Commonwealth of Massachusetts; Albany, New York; Huntington, West Virginia; Ashland, Oregon; State of Kentucky; Lower Meramec Valley, Missouri; Denton, Texas; Phoenix/Maricopa County, Arizona; and Mystic River in Massachusetts.  Results, to date, demonstrate the benefits of using green infrastructure for multiple community goals including hazard mitigation, water quality, and floodplain management.  Several of the communities are already seeing reduced flood insurance rates based on adoption of stormwater policies that reduce risk. 
  • Building Flood Resilience in Vermont – In 2011, Tropical Storm Irene caused significant flood damage to historic structures, homes and businesses in Vermont’s Mad River Valley.  In 2012 at Vermont’s request, EPA partnered with FEMA to identify state and local policy options to increase community flood resilience.  The state adopted several of the strategies that emerged from the workshop.  The project developed a Flood Resilience Checklist that communities can use to assess their preparedness for future flooding events. The state provided this checklist to several other Vermont communities through a follow up project, the Vermont Economic Resiliency Initiative, and the checklist is the basis for the Flood Resilience for Riverine and Coastal Communities tool offered by EPA’s Building Blocks for Sustainable Communities Program.

FEMA Announces New Wildfire Aid

July 2019

FEMA’s Hazard Mitigation Grant Program (HMGP) funds are now available to support wildfire recovery and implement mitigation projects absent a major disaster declaration. 

This new post fire program, titled HMGP Post Fire, is part of the agency’s implementation of the Disaster Recovery Reform Act (DRRA) of 2018. Section 1204 of the DRRA amended Sections 404 and Section 420 of the Stafford Act, and allows FEMA to provide HMGP Post Fire assistance to any area that received a Fire Management Assistance grant (FMAG) declaration under Section 420 on or after October 5, 2018.  In recent fiscal years, HMGP funds were provided for these post-fire events on a temporary basis; the amended Section 404 (and 420) now permits permanent funding under HMGP.

FEMA encourages the mitigation of wildfire and related hazards, such as flood or erosion.  The amount of funding available to recipients will be determined by the type of hazard mitigation plan, i.e., standard or enhanced, approved for each state, territory, or tribe, and the number of FMAG declarations recipients receive during a fiscal year (Oct 1-Sept 30).  Federally-recognized tribes may apply as recipients if they have burned land from the FMAG-declared event.  Project funding is prioritized based on project type and location.

Read more about the Hazard Mitigation Grant Program Post Fire Program.

 
 

News from 2018 Worthy of Repeating 

 

Water Organizations of Kentucky – Water Organizations of Kentucky

August 2018

Kentucky Water Resources Research Institute (KWRRI), created the poster, Water Organizations of Kentucky, to serve as an overview of water organizations and facilitate networking among organizations.  Download here: Water Organizations of Kentucky (PDF, 1pg).

If you would like to purchase a printed copy of the poster, please contact kwrri@uky.edu.

 
 

 

Story Map Highlights Award-Winning CTP: Kentucky Division of Water Resources

Kentucky CTP Story Map

When it comes to mapping Kentucky’s floodplains, the Kentucky Division of Water (KDOW) is a Cooperating Technical Partner (CTP) with FEMA.  The CTP Program is an innovative approach to creating partnerships between FEMA and other agencies that have the interest and capability to become more active participants in the FEMA flood hazard mapping program.  

In 2018, KDOW was awarded 1st place in the CTP Recognition Program.  The Division was recognized by FEMA for excellence in Communications, Outreach and Program Management for integrating different technologies to communicate flood risk, including virtual reality and live polling during meetings, and for embracing a variety of partnerships.  KDOW’s work has been featured in a story map that is an interactive product that uses GIS maps, narrative text, images and video to showcase CTP work.

View the story map at http://arcg.is/1nqua0 to see some of the great things that the Kentucky Risk MAP team had done over the past several years.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Mitigation Matters!  

Have questions, contact us at help@kymitigation.org.

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